fbpx

New advisory board member, Fran Towey, former CEO of Fullscript

We are committed to Empowering people to advocate for their health and raise awareness for those living with kidney disease.

Santa Barbara Nutrients announces new advisory board
member, Fran Towey, former CEO of Fullscript

Santa Barbara, California – April 27th, 2022

Fran founded Bayberry Lane Partners LLC in 2022 after serving as Chairman and Chief Executive Offer of Fullscript, an Integrative Healthcare delivery platform. Prior to Fullscript he served as President and CEO of a leading private equity owned company in the professional health and wellness industry. Fran earned a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University, in Boston, MA and an Executive MBA from Fogelman College of Business and Economics at the University of Memphis.

He also sits on the board of trustees for Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences, and is an advisor for Findway Ventures, a fund that guides impact entrepreneurs on the great adventure of using business to make a positive difference in the world, and he is a former trustee at the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation.

Towey remarked, “PKD is deeply personal to me. As is often the case with PKD, it’s a family affair. I’m affected by ADPKD, as well as my mother, my siblings, and one of my children. The good work being done by the Santa Barbara Nutrients team aligns perfectly with my commitment to advocacy and support of PKD, and I look forward to supporting their mission.”

About Santa Barbara Nutrients, Inc.

Santa Barbara Nutrients is a public benefit corporation incorporated in Delaware and headquartered in Santa Barbara, California. The experienced SBN team is composed of kidney researchers, patients, and other industry professionals dedicated to bringing to market novel medical foods and other innovative products to help people with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and other renal diseases.

The company is committed to scientific and clinical research to develop science backed products that support human health and address significant unmet medical needs.

For more information, please visit www.SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Contact:

Email: Info@SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Phone: 1+805-272-0029

FT-headshot-2022

New advisory board member, Chris Leamon, leader in clinical research

We are committed to Empowering people to advocate for their health and raise awareness for those living with kidney disease.

Santa Barbara Nutrients announces new advisory board
member, Chris Leamon, leader in clinical research

Santa Barbara, California – March 23rd, 2022

 

Dr. Leamon earned an ACS-certified B.S. degree in Chemistry from Baldwin Wallace University and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Purdue University. He began his professional career in the pharmaceutical industry where he conducted targeted drug delivery research in the fields of peptide, oligonucleotide, liposome and DNA drug delivery for GlaxoSmithKline, Inc. and Ionis Pharmaceuticals. 

He later helped to establish Endocyte, Inc. where he was a named executive officer. While there he led the Company’s targeted drug discovery division, which included oncology, inflammation and polycystic kidney disease programs, for 20 years until its 2018 acquisition by Novartis.  Following a 3-year integration, Dr. Leamon left Novartis to become Chief Scientific Officer at Fusion Pharmaceuticals to help advance a diverse pipeline of targeted radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy. 

Dr. Leamon has published over 90 articles and is an inventor on more than 60 issued or submitted patents. Importantly, in 2015 he was the recipient of the 2015 American Chemical Society, George and Christine Sosnovsky Award for Cancer Research. To date, Dr. Leamon’s efforts have yielded 8 clinically investigated imaging and therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

About Santa Barbara Nutrients, Inc.

Santa Barbara Nutrients is a public benefit corporation incorporated in Delaware and headquartered in Santa Barbara, California. The experienced SBN team is composed of kidney researchers, patients, and other industry professionals dedicated to bringing to market novel medical foods and other innovative products to help people with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and other renal diseases.

The company is committed to scientific and clinical research to develop science backed products that support human health and address significant unmet medical needs.

For more information, please visit www.SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Contact:

Email: Info@SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Phone: 1+805-272-0029

Screen Shot 2022-03-05 at 11.28.34 PM

First Medical Food for Dietary Management of PKD Launched

We are committed to Empowering people to advocate for their health and raise awareness for those living with kidney disease.

First Medical Food for the Dietary Management of Polycystic Kidney Disease Launched

The first-of-its-kind product, named KetoCitraTM, is based on breakthrough research by University of California Santa Barbara professor Dr. Thomas Weimbs, a recognized leader in the Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) research field, and Dr. Jacob Torres, Head Researcher of Santa Barbara Nutrients (SBN).

Santa Barbara, California – December 6th, 2021

The patented technology underlying KetoCitraTM was initially developed by Dr. Weimbs and Dr. Torres at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They discovered that a combination of two  natural compounds – beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and citrate – has a synergistic effect in halting  or slowing the progression of PKD in animal models.

With kidney health and safety as a priority during the product’s development, SBN worked with a premier group of advisors that included some of the leading scientists, medical doctors and  dietitians in the renal field worldwide.

“The launch of KetoCitraTM is a seminal moment for both Santa Barbara Nutrients and PKD  patients. Our focus is to bring hope to the millions of PKD patients around the world, and we  think KetoCitraTM has the potential to achieve that,” said Dr. Weimbs, President and Founder  of Santa Barbara Nutrients.

What is polycystic kidney disease?

PKD is one of the most common, life-threatening genetic diseases, causing kidney enlargement  and function loss over time. The disease affects over 600,000 Americans and 13 million people  worldwide and is one of the leading causes of kidney failure requiring dialysis or kidney  transplantation. There is no cure.

About KetoCitra TM

The research by Dr. Weimbs and Dr. Torres showed that two natural compounds, beta hydroxybutyrate (BHB) and citric acid (citrate), can help the nutritional management of PKD by  addressing the metabolic abnormalities that manifest during the progression of the disease.

KetoCitraTM is specifically designed with these two ingredients in a formulation that also delivers  beneficial minerals and an alkaline load intended to support the balancing of urine pH. The  inclusion of calcium and magnesium helps to manage the dietary absorption of the renal  stressors oxalate and inorganic phosphate.

KetoCitraTM uses only ingredients that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS), is sodium- and  sugar-free and formulated to be kidney-safe when used as directed. As a medical food,  KetoCitraTM is to be taken under medical supervision. KetoCitraTM can be taken by itself but is  recommended to be taken in conjunction with specific dietary and lifestyle changes. Researchers at SBN have collaborated with experienced renal dietitians to create a dietary program called Ren.Nu that is administered by the non-profit RenAlign. Patients in the Ren.Nu  program, which launches in January 2022, learn to implement a plant-focused, kidney-safe  ketogenic diet, together with KetoCitraTM, in a sustainable way.

About Santa Barbara Nutrients, Inc.  

Santa Barbara Nutrients is a public benefit corporation incorporated in Delaware and  headquartered in Santa Barbara, California. The experienced SBN team is composed of kidney  researchers, patients, and other industry professionals dedicated to bringing to market novel  medical foods and other innovative products to help people with PKD and other renal diseases.

The company is committed to scientific and clinical research to develop science backed  products that support human health and address significant unmet medical needs.

For more information, please visit www.SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Want to read more? https://www.news.ucsb.edu/2021/020480/ketocitra-here

Contact:

Email: Info@SantaBarbaraNutrients.com

Phone: 1+805-272-0029

Dietary Ambiguities with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

The article we will be discussing today is:

What are the information needs and concerns of individuals with Polycystic Kidney Disease? Results of an online survey using Facebook and social listening analysis

Tiffany Ma and Kelly Lambert (2021).

BMC Nephrology Volume 22 Issue 263

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02472-1

Journal Club Discussion

“Are there foods that are less stressful on kidneys… or things I should avoid besides the broad low-sodium recommendation?” – study participant with PKD

As a PKD patient or family member of someone with PKD, have you ever returned home from a doctor’s appointment confused about something the doctor said, or curious about what to do or eat to help preserve your kidneys?  You then opened your computer to do a bit of searching. 

There have been very few studies to date that have looked into what information PKD patients are really looking for. The study by Tiffany Ma and Kelly Lambert documents what people with PKD are searching for online, what they perceive as major challenges of living with PKD, and overwhelmingly, the question of what do I eat?

Facebook groups can be a wonderful community-building tool to share information with other people who are living with PKD. Perhaps you even found this blog post through a PKD-oriented Facebook group. If that’s the case, you are not alone. Out of 536 participants who completed surveys for this study, 69.9% of them used Facebook to find information on PKD. The accessibility of online resources, and the feeling of camaraderie and support strongly resonated with the participants. But what are they looking for in these online spaces?

What do we want?

Information about the type of diet and nutrition guidelines for PKD!

When do we want it?

From the time of diagnosis!

A main conclusion from this study was: “The major information need expressed by participants with PKD was for dietary information.”

81% of participants searched online for PKD-specific dietary information. Ideally, participants wanted information from their primary care physician or nephrologist when they were initially diagnosed. They were hopeful they would be provided with online resources or pointed in the direction of credible information. The internet is a vast space that can provide a plethora of information. However, the internet also contains a large amount of contradictory or unvalidated information. 

Another main conclusion of this study was: “…many participants in this study expressed a tangible sense of frustration and confusion because of vague and inconsistent dietary information.”

…and patients reported… “… inability to access renal nutrition expertise as well as  inconsistent dietary information from primary care physicians and nephrologists.”

“Frustrations about the lack of specific information led many to conduct their own research online.”

These frustrations are illustrated in the words of PKD patients themselves, as cited in this study:

“…I just (want) simple meal plans… and recipes… according to what stage you’re in, how much protein, phosphorus and potassium…”

“(my biggest concern) is… am I doing the right thing (with my diet)? What should I do?”

“(I want information on) the effects of the Keto diet, intermittent fasting, & other dietary options potentially beneficial to those with PKD”

“Educating nephrologists worldwide. I find myself being more knowledgeable on modern clinical trials, medicines, diet, etc. for PKD patients”

So where do you go to find this information? 

“Creation of high-quality evidence-based resources for individuals with PKD is required” (Ma and Lambert, 2021). Expanding upon this conclusion, these high-quality resources also have to be easily accessible and more well-known among healthcare professionals treating people with PKD. 

Ma and Lambert wrote: “Programs such as the online Ren.Nu PKD Nutrition Program may help improve access to specialised credible dietetic care for people with PKD.”

We couldn’t agree more and thank the authors for the shout-out! 

The scientists at  Santa Barbara Nutrients are proud to have contributed to the development of the Ren.Nu program, which takes patients step-by-step through understanding the dietary requirements of PKD. Ren.Nu was developed around a plant-focused, clean and kidney-safe diet that avoids renal stressors while achieving the metabolic state of ketosis. The approach is the result of a collaboration between researchers and clinicians who’ve come together to provide individuals with dietary recommendations and interventions for PKD.  To learn more about this novel concept, you can watch an interview with Ren.Nu co-founder Jessiana Saville, where she shares her perspective on nutrition therapy for PKD.

The Ren.Nu program also runs a popular Facebook group that is moderated by dietitians and contains lots of free resources and tips along with great discussions and sharing of experiences by PKD patients. Anyone with PKD can request to join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/pkdnutrition 

Does the Ma and Lambert article sound like your journey of searching for PKD information? 

What do you commonly search for and what information do you wish you were given earlier on? 

References:

Ma, T., and Lambert, K. (2021). What are the information needs and concerns of individuals with Polycystic Kidney Disease? Results of an online survey using Facebook and social listening analysis. BMC Nephrology, 22(1) 263. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02472-1; PMID: 34261447

Dietary Ambiguities with Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

The article we will be discussing today is:

What are the information needs and concerns of individuals with Polycystic Kidney Disease? Results of an online survey using Facebook and social listening analysis

Tiffany Ma and Kelly Lambert (2021).

BMC Nephrology Volume 22 Issue 263

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02472-1

Journal Club Discussion

“Are there foods that are less stressful on kidneys… or things I should avoid besides the broad low-sodium recommendation?” – study participant with PKD

As a PKD patient or family member of someone with PKD, have you ever returned home from a doctor’s appointment confused about something the doctor said, or curious about what to do or eat to help preserve your kidneys?  You then opened your computer to do a bit of searching. 

There have been very few studies to date that have looked into what information PKD patients are really looking for. The study by Tiffany Ma and Kelly Lambert documents what people with PKD are searching for online, what they perceive as major challenges of living with PKD, and overwhelmingly, the question of what do I eat?

Facebook groups can be a wonderful community-building tool to share information with other people who are living with PKD. Perhaps you even found this blog post through a PKD-oriented Facebook group. If that’s the case, you are not alone. Out of 536 participants who completed surveys for this study, 69.9% of them used Facebook to find information on PKD. The accessibility of online resources, and the feeling of camaraderie and support strongly resonated with the participants. But what are they looking for in these online spaces?

What do we want?

Information about the type of diet and nutrition guidelines for PKD!

When do we want it?

From the time of diagnosis!

A main conclusion from this study was: “The major information need expressed by participants with PKD was for dietary information.”

81% of participants searched online for PKD-specific dietary information. Ideally, participants wanted information from their primary care physician or nephrologist when they were initially diagnosed. They were hopeful they would be provided with online resources or pointed in the direction of credible information. The internet is a vast space that can provide a plethora of information. However, the internet also contains a large amount of contradictory or unvalidated information. 

Another main conclusion of this study was: “…many participants in this study expressed a tangible sense of frustration and confusion because of vague and inconsistent dietary information.”

…and patients reported… “… inability to access renal nutrition expertise as well as  inconsistent dietary information from primary care physicians and nephrologists.”

“Frustrations about the lack of specific information led many to conduct their own research online.”

These frustrations are illustrated in the words of PKD patients themselves, as cited in this study:

“…I just (want) simple meal plans… and recipes… according to what stage you’re in, how much protein, phosphorus and potassium…”

“(my biggest concern) is… am I doing the right thing (with my diet)? What should I do?”

“(I want information on) the effects of the Keto diet, intermittent fasting, & other dietary options potentially beneficial to those with PKD”

“Educating nephrologists worldwide. I find myself being more knowledgeable on modern clinical trials, medicines, diet, etc. for PKD patients”

So where do you go to find this information? 

“Creation of high-quality evidence-based resources for individuals with PKD is required” (Ma and Lambert, 2021). Expanding upon this conclusion, these high-quality resources also have to be easily accessible and more well-known among healthcare professionals treating people with PKD. 

Ma and Lambert wrote: “Programs such as the online Ren.Nu PKD Nutrition Program may help improve access to specialised credible dietetic care for people with PKD.”

We couldn’t agree more and thank the authors for the shout-out! 

The scientists at  Santa Barbara Nutrients are proud to have contributed to the development of the Ren.Nu program, which takes patients step-by-step through understanding the dietary requirements of PKD. Ren.Nu was developed around a plant-focused, clean and kidney-safe diet that avoids renal stressors while achieving the metabolic state of ketosis. The approach is the result of a collaboration between researchers and clinicians who’ve come together to provide individuals with dietary recommendations and interventions for PKD.  To learn more about this novel concept, you can watch an interview with Ren.Nu co-founder Jessiana Saville, where she shares her perspective on nutrition therapy for PKD.

The Ren.Nu program also runs a popular Facebook group that is moderated by dietitians and contains lots of free resources and tips along with great discussions and sharing of experiences by PKD patients. Anyone with PKD can request to join: https://www.facebook.com/groups/pkdnutrition 

Does the Ma and Lambert article sound like your journey of searching for PKD information? 

What do you commonly search for and what information do you wish you were given earlier on? 

References:

Ma, T., and Lambert, K. (2021). What are the information needs and concerns of individuals with Polycystic Kidney Disease? Results of an online survey using Facebook and social listening analysis. BMC Nephrology, 22(1) 263. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-021-02472-1; PMID: 34261447